Bus Stop, Hahoe Village

Except for the air-con and advert, local buses look much the same as they do in old films.
Except for the air-con and advert, local buses look much the same as they do in old films.

When I was making a last batch of photos for my exhibition last year, I travelled to the village of Hahoe near Andong. When I first visited the village about fifteen years ago there were cheap trinkets being sold from a lot of the houses for the tourists. And not even Korean cheap trinkets. I especially remember a large wooden pencil with a U.S. flag on it. Not exactly the traditional Korea I had travelled to see. The village’s applications to become a UNESCO Heritage Site were rejected because of this sort of thing.
But the village cleaned itself up and in 2010 it was accepted as a heritage site. I went in the autumn on a weekday so I didn’t run into the weekend horde of tourists. I made some good photographs in the afternoon and morning and I slept in a house like the one in the picture above. Sleeping on a heated floor on a yo (a thin mattress) is a pleasure in life, especially when you can watch the shadows of trees on the paper windows.
The buses to and from the village are not that frequent and when they arrive the driver turns off the engine, gets out, and has a rest. This gave me time to walk away and make a photo with my Zeiss Ikon ZM. It’s the only film photo I made, I think. The others were done with my iPhone. I want to visit the village again next autumn with either the Fuji digital camera or, perhaps more in fitting with the traditional nature of the village, a film camera like the Zeiss or my Contax 645.

While You’re Waiting or Not Waiting

A couple of weeks ago I visited an historical site and made some photos using a Zeiss Ikon ZM without using a tripod. I liked some of the photos I got back but they are a bit soft. I’m not sure if this is because of the film (Ilford XP2 Super 400), my technique (though it doesn’t look like camera shake), or the scans. So I went back several days ago and tried to make the same photos using ISO50 black and white film in the Contax 645. I think I will wait until I get that film back before deciding whether or not to share on this website. I hope they are better than the 35mm photos but who knows? Perhaps the light wasn’t as interesting, etc.

In the meantime, here’s a cat.

Cat in window light. Zeiss Ikon ZM, Planar 2/50, Agfa CT PRecisa 100.
Cat in window light. Zeiss Ikon ZM, Planar 2/50, Agfa CT PRecisa 100.

Three Views of Gangneung Harbour

Gangneung Harbour was once called Anmok Harbour, after the village that is there. A few years ago the name was changed, possibly for reasons of tourism. All the photos below were taken with the Zeiss Ikon ZM rangefinder camera and the Zeiss Planar 2/50 lens. I’m fairly certain the film was Agfa CT Precisa 100 but, if it wasn’t, it was Fujifilm Provia 100F.

Military cargo plane flying over the harbour.
Military cargo plane flying over the harbour.
Work on the harbour (planting a breakwater) and three unofficial supervisors.
Work on the harbour (planting a breakwater) and three unofficial supervisors.
Artsy-Fartsy view of the river mouth.  The river empties next to the artificial harbour. In the distance is a place to receive natural gas (I think).
Artsy-Fartsy view of the river mouth. The river empties next to the artificial harbour. In the distance is a place to receive natural gas (I think).

Scenes from a coffee shop

The village of Anmok in the city of Gangneung was/is a small fishing village. Before moving to Gangneung I had heard of the village’s ‘coffee street’. Every fish restaurant along the beach road had one or two coffee vending machines and this, along with the fresh sashimi, was the village’s claim to fame.
Fast forward ten or more years to the present and the village is now a long row of raw fish restaurants (sashimi sounds much better, doesn’t it?) and corporate chain coffee shops. There’s also a new marina and in the marina building there is a coffee shop on the top floor. Some time ago I went up there with a couple of friends and while they drank coffee I made a few photos.

Zeiss Ikon ZM, Planar 2/50, Agfa CT Precisa 100 film
Zeiss Ikon ZM, Planar 2/50, Agfa CT Precisa 100 film

The view towards the beach road with all the coffee shops, restaurants, and hotels. Behind the beach road are a maze of alleys where the houses and walls probably haven’t changed in many decades.

Zeiss Ikon ZM, Planar 2/50, Agfa CT Precisa 100 Film
Zeiss Ikon ZM, Planar 2/50, Agfa CT Precisa 100 Film

The coffee shop has a balcony where the smokers congregate and ruin the balcony for everyone else. Luckily, it was raining on the day I was there and the smokers had to suffer inside the coffee shop.

Cabbages

Today I saw cabbages being picked and loaded into trucks for market.  The heads of cabbage will be sold for making gimchi and the leftover heads and leaves in the field will probably be hung and dried for making winter soups.  I remembered I had a photo of a cabbage field and I include it here along with photos of drying chillies and an autumn tree.

Cabbage Field Ricoh GR10, Fuji C200 film
Cabbage Field
Ricoh GR10, Fuji C200 film
Drying Chillies Zeiss Ikon ZM, 50/2 Planar, Agfa CT Precisa 100 film
Drying Chillies
Zeiss Ikon ZM, Planar 2/50, Agfa CT Precisa 100 film
Backlit Autumn Leaves Ricoh GR10, Fuji C200 film
Backlit Autumn Leaves
Ricoh GR10, Fuji C200 film

Animals and Galleries

My photo teacher’s workshop is near the university at the edge of the city.  The property next door has cows and while waiting for my teacher to arrive one day I went over to say hello.  Cows are curious creatures and as soon as I said hello to one of them, the rest of them showed up to see what was going on.  Or maybe they had never seen a white person before? (I’m a visible minority here).  I lifted my camera up over my head and pressed the shutter release button.  I got lucky with the composition but I wish that post wasn’t in front of the cow’s nose and that I could see more of the rear cow’s face.  Still, not bad for a snapshot.

Cattle in plastic barn. Ricoh GR10, Fujicolor C200 film
Cattle in plastic barn.
Ricoh GR10, Fujicolor C200 film

I have to admit my ignorance and say that I don’t know if these are cows or bulls.  They have horns . . . but cows have horns as well?  Someone let me know . . . .

The next photo was taken in the city near the bus station.  I was walking past this window when I saw the chicken come from out around the side of the building.  I sized him up and he sized me up.  I moved left and he went right.  I went right and he went left.  I made a few photos.  Then I realised I could get him into a good position for a photo by pre-focusing and slowly walking to my right.  He moved to the left into the spot I wanted and I made the photo.

Chicken in street Zeiss Ikon ZM, 50/2 Planar, Agfa CT Precisa 100
Chicken in street
Zeiss Ikon ZM, Planar 2/50, Agfa CT Precisa 100

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I changed this website address from marcuskoreanus.wordpress.com to marcuspeddle.com.  It makes it easier for people to find and remember my website.  Once my exhibition in December is finished I’ll be wanting to direct people here in case they want to buy prints and using my real name dot com is much better.
I have several photo albums on this website that haven’t been updated in quite a while.  Not to mention the flurry of inactivity over on Flickr.  I guess I really need to go through my folders in Lightroom and choose some photos to add to the albums.  The problem is, how many photos should I have in each album?  Twenty-one seems like a good number.  Should I just have fine-art albums?  Is street photography okay?  How about fun photos like the cows above?  Maybe everything is okay if I label the albums appropriately.  Decisions, decisions . . . . .