Organised, Finally!(?)

Perhaps I mentioned before that after my exhibition I didn’t feel like making any photos for several weeks. Possibly because the experience of having an exhibition was exhausting or possibly because I didn’t know what to do next and so I didn’t do anything. When I did go out to make photographs I used a number of different cameras and a number of different films, with no satisfactory results. Finally, about a week or so ago, I decided that I needed to get organised and stop photographing everything and nothing. I thought about what I most like to photograph and what the best camera for that subject would be. I ended up writing down three projects but I decided to use my Contax 645 for all of them. This will prevent equipment from distracting me from the photography. Each project will have a different film but I’m going to consistently use the same film for each project. Again, this simplifies things and lets me get on with my photography.
Once I had that settled, I spent nearly a full day sorting and putting away prints and film that had piled up on my shelves. Another distraction gone and I felt I could now start fresh. I also made up a system of organising photographs from the time I take the roll of film out of the camera to the time I put prints and film into folders for archiving. I hope I can stick to my system.
So what are the three projects? One, Korean traditional buildings and scenes. The Korea that doesn’t really exist any more except at historical sites. Two, street scenes from modern Korean cities. Or maybe just my city. Three, grave sites. There are lots of interesting tombs in Korea, both new and old.
The photos I want to share today are for the first project. These were all taken at the birthplace of Heo Gyun, a 16th century politician and writer, and his sister Heo Nanseolheon, a poet. I’m hoping to do the photos in a Modernist style but we’ll see how that works out. All these photos were made using a Contax 645 and Ilford XP2 Super 400 film.

I'm pretty sure the plastic wrapped around the door handle wasn't there in the 16th century.
I’m pretty sure the plastic wrapped around the door handle wasn’t there in the 16th century.
Same door, different composition.
Same door, different composition.
Inside sliding doors.
Inside sliding doors.
This sort of wooden wall is usually found on animal pens or workrooms like kitchens.
This sort of wooden wall is usually found on animal pens or workrooms like kitchens.

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